Larkin & Lacey

U.S. District Judge, Sharon R. Bolton made good on the pardoning of America’s most controversial sheriff, Joe Arpaio, by making President Donald Trump’s request official. While this was a move that took few by surprise, Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey, who has been at odds with “Sheriff Joe” since he was elected to office in 1992, spoke to the media in order to express their disapproval. Learn more about Michael Lacey and Jim Larkin: http://james-larkin.com/press/ and http://james-larkin.com/about/

Michael Lacey described the decision by President Trump as “the perfect marriage of two corrupt individuals,” going on to list just a few of the crimes that have been linked to the former sheriff over his tenure.

Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey’s opposition to the crimes of Joe Arpaio and the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Department eventually resulted in their unlawful arrest at the hands of Joe Arpaio’s Deputies.

Although the charges were dismissed almost as quickly as they were dispersed, the result was a three-year court battle in which Larkin and Lacey emerged victorious, garnering a $3.75 million settlement.

In 1970, the Vietnam War was ravaging the morale of the entire United States, and as protests erupted everywhere, particularly on college campuses, the need for an alternative take on the happenings to contrast the ultra-conservative nature of traditional news outlets, was growing at a fast pace. Read more:  Read more: Lacey and Larkin Frontera Fund and Village Voice Media | Wikipedia

At the time, Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey were both dropouts of Arizona State University and having just experienced the wave of emotion felt throughout the country due to the recent Kent State Killings, they set out to join the protest by producing their own take on news in America. Joined by Karen Lofgren, Frank Fiore, Nick Stupey, and Hal Smith, Larkin and Lacey produced the first issue of Phoenix New Times, receiving significant praise for their free weekly.

As the desire for the Phoenix New Times began to garner public traction, the issue grew in size, as well as in the range of topics that it covered. The implementation of satirical cartoons proved to be groundbreaking for the fledgling magazine, and with Jim Larkin’s acute business sense, they began to procure ads by prominent companies, including the juggernaut, J.C. Penny.

Throughout the 1970’s, the demand for alternative news continued to grow, and at the onset of the 1980’s, the company branded as New Times Inc, had acquired Westword- a local Denver arts-and-news weekly publication.

This move would be the beginning of a number of acquisitions that resulted in 17 additional publications joining the New Times roster, including Nashville Scene, LA Weekly, OC Weekly, and the Village Voice. Over the years New Times Inc continued to flourish due to their spot-on investigative reporting and their coverage of issues that mattered to a myriad of people often neglected by mainstream society.

By 2012, New Times had become one of the leading forces in the world of alternative news, and Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey decided that it was time to leave the company they had cultivated over the course of four decades.

Today, Larkin and Lacey are actively involved in the Frontera Fund, which was started with the proceeds of their successful lawsuit against Joe Arpaio and the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Department, and they recently returned to media with the implementation of FrontPage Confidential.

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